Beavers & Muskrats

Beaver
Beavers

beaver-damage (2)

Beaver Den
Beaver Den
Muskrat
Muskrats

Beaver (Castor canadensis) are the largest rodent found in North America and are common throughout the state of Connecticut. They typically inhabit rivers, streams, lakes, ponds, swamps and wetlands and prefer to feed on twigs, roots, tree bark, shrubs and leaves of aspen, willow, birch, ash, alder and apple trees. Primarily nocturnal but also active in the daytime hours, the beaver is the only animal that is able to create or change it’s environment to better suit it’s needs. By instinctually building brush and mud dams in streams or at the outlets of man made ponds and lakes, the beaver creates it’s own pond, or “flowage.” These ponds, which must be fairly deep, are used as access to food and protection from predators. It is because of the beaver’s instinctual need to build dams and cut trees that conflict arises with homeowners and property owners. Although beaver activity generally results in positive benefits for the environment and other species, on occasion, that activity can lead to problems for homeowners as well as public health and safety concerns. Beaver dams can cause flooding that damages property, crops, septic tanks, and wells. Beaver damming can also lead to basement water damage and flooding.

Though there are no known repellents for beaver that have established a territory, there are a number of options that may help alleviate problems caused by beavers while allowing you to tolerate their existence on your property. If you would like to discuss particular beaver damage prevention methods, such and tree and shrub protection, or exclusion methods, please give PAWS a call at 860-840-3237.

In some cases, a beaver population may not be tolerated. If you are experiencing problems or significant damage to your home or property due to beaver activity please give us a call. Although beaver trapping, removal and control for nuisance complaints requires a special permit from the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (which is given on a case by case basis by a state Nuisance Wildlife Biologist), PAWS is fully experienced in beaver trapping and is capable and able to help with your beaver problems.


Muskrat (Ondatra zibethica) are a semi-aquatic, nocturnal and highly territorial rodent that are common throughout Connecticut. Though muskrats are rarely the cause of nuisance complaints, on occasion they do damage gardens, crops and property. If you believe your are experiencing damage as the cause of a muskrat population, please give PAWS a call at 860-840-3237. Like beaver, muskrat trapping, removal and control for nuisance complaints requires a special permit from the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (which is given on a case by case basis by a state Nuisance Wildlife Biologist), PAWS is fully experienced in muskrat trapping and is capable and able to help with your muskrat problems.

During the regulated winter trapping seasons I am more than happy to help control a beaver or muskrat population on your property at NO COST TO YOU. The regulated trapping season for beaver in the state of Connecticut generally runs from December 1st – March 31st (Dates and season length may change on a year to year basis). The regulated trapping season for muskrat in the state of Connecticut typically opens in early November. I am a licensed and experienced fur trapper in the state of Connecticut and a member of the Connecticut Trappers Association. With the appropriate paperwork noting your written permission to use your property for trapping purposes I will be able to trap nuisance beavers under the laws and regulations governing fur trapping. I am safety-oriented and highly selective of where and when I place traps during the regulated trapping season. Please note that this form of trapping is in no way connected to Problem Animals & Wildlife Services, LLC and is solely done by myself as an individual. I offer this free service to anyone interested in controlling a nuisance beaver or muskrat population on their own property when money is a concern or the state will not issue a permit to trap on a nuisance complaint. I am a firm believer in the “waste not” model of hunting, fishing & trapping. Wild fur is a self-sustaining, “green” resource. I sell all my furs at auction and I do eat beaver meat.